Pope Family Tree

Henry IsaacsonAge: 73 years15811654

Name
Henry Isaacson

Henrici Isaacson

Name
Henrici Isaacson
Birth September 1581
Birth about 1583
Education
Pembroke Hall

Birth of a son
#1
Richard Isaacson
1610 (Age 28 years)

Birth of a brotherWilliam Isaacson
about 1612 (Age 30 years)

Birth of a son
#2
William Isaacson
1615 (Age 33 years)

Death of a fatherRichard Isaacson
between January 19, 1618/19 CE (January 29, 1619) and January 19, 1619/20 CE (January 29, 1620) (Age 37 years)
Birth of a son
#3
Franciscus Isaacson
1624 (Age 42 years)

Birth of a son
#4
Anthony Isaacson I
November 6, 1626 (Age 45 years)
Birth of a son
#5
Anthony Isaacson I
November 6, 1626 (Age 45 years)
Death after 1626 (Age 44 years)

Birth of a daughter
#6
Lucia Isaacson
1633 (Age 51 years)

Death December 7, 1654 (Age 73 years)

Family with parents - View this family
father
Richard Isaacson
Birth: St. Catharine Coleman, , , England
Death: between January 19, 1618/19 CE (January 29, 1619) and January 19, 1619/20 CE (January 29, 1620)London, London, England
mother
himself
31 years
younger brother
Family with Elizabeth Fan - View this family
himself
wife
son
-11 years
son
-4 years
son
15 years
son
son
son
son
son
daughter
Family with Elizabethae - View this family
himself
wife
son

Education

FROM CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY ALUMNI, 1261-1900: ISAACSON, HENRY College: PEMBROKE HALL Entered: Born: Died: Said to have been of PEMBROKE HALL. 1st s. of Richard, of St Catherine Coleman, citizen and painter-stainer. B. in London, Sept. 1581. Treasurer of Bridewell and Bedlam, 1643-54. Elected Chamberlain of London, 1651, but declined. Amanuensis and intimate friend of Bishop Lancelot Andrewes. Married Elizabeth, dau. of John Fan, of London. Author, historical and theological. Died Dec. 7, 1654. Will (P.C.C.) 1655. Brother of William (1612-3), father of Anthony and of William (1632). (D.N.B.; Vis. of London, 1634.)

NOTE:

PEMBROKE HALL was later known as Pembroke College Lancelot Andrewes (1555-1626), Bishop of Winchester, was on the committee of scholars that produced the King James Translation of the Bible, and probably contributed more to that work than any other single person. It is accordingly no surprise to find him not only a devout writer but a learned and eloquent one, a master of English prose, and learned in Latin, Greek, Hebrew and eighteen other languages. His sermons were popular in his own day, but are perhaps too academic for most modern readers. He prepared for his own use a manuscript notebook of Private Prayers, which was published after his death. The material was apparently intended, not to be read aloud, but to serve as a guide and stimulus to devout meditation.

Shortly after his death in 1630 (Andrewes) his amanuensis and chaplain, Henry Isaacson, compiled from Andrewes’ papers a collection of prayers to cover every aspect of life. As well as morning and evening prayers, there are eucharistic prayers, prayers in sickness and approaching death.